Tag Archives: Core Beliefs

BPD And Rigid Thinking

inflexible thinking

bpd and rigid thinking

One of the main hallmarks of borderline personality disorder (BPD) is the pronounced tendency of those who suffer from it to display marked rigidity in relation to both their thought processes and behaviors. 

This means that, when events occur, the way in which the BPD sufferer interprets them tend to be habitual and fixed and it is very difficult indeed for him/her to adopt a more flexible view or alternative perspective ; instead, once the rigid way of interpreting events formulated in his/her mind, it becomes a kind of idée fixe (the problem is compounded, of course, because, very frequently, such rigid thinking also leads to rigid, inflexible behavior) that s/he, terrier-like, refuses, seemingly at all costs (even if such incurred costs are extraordinarily, perhaps tragically, high), to relinquish (sometimes, it has to be said, provoking great exasperation, pain and frustration in others, particularly those who are not well versed in the disorder).

Rigid thinking is associated with poor mental health, not least because it can give rise to obsessive worry and rumination (intensely and chronically focusing on one’s problems) and a dysfunctional way of interacting with others.

rigid thinking

Examples Of Rigid Beliefs :

Examples of rigid beliefs include :

  • others should always agree with me and see things from exactly the same perspective as I do
  • others should never behave in ways of which I disapprove
  • if others don’t agree with me it’s because they’re stupid
  • I need to always be right
  • things must go perfectly
  • I must be liked and approved of by everyone at all times
  • others can NEVER be trusted and will always eventually screw you over

cognitive rigidity

Core Beliefs :

Our fundamental core beliefs about ourselves, others and the world in general develop early on in childhood and this period of development is closely related to how flexible / inflexible our ‘thinking style’ becomes. If this period is traumatic, stressful and involves chronically dysfunctional relationships with significant others (most of all, our primary carer) we are at high risk of developing negative core beliefs and a rigid way of thinking that can very seriously harm our adult lives including our intimate relationships, friendships and career. To read my article, previously published on this site, which explains more about core beliefs, click here

Possible Therapies :

Therapies that can help you change your core beliefs and correct a dysfunctional, rigid thinking style that derive, at least in part, from the theories of Albert Ellis (a pioneer and expert in this field of psychology) include rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT)cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)  and dialectical behavior therapy (DBT).

 

 

RETURN TO BPD AND CHILDHOOD TRAUMA MAIN ARTICLE

 

RESOURCES :

FLEXIBLE ATTITUDE – SELF HYPNOSIS DOWNLOADS

STOP HAVING A CLOSED MIND – SELF HYPNOSIS DOWNLOADS

David Hosier BSc Hons; MSc; PGDE(FAHE).

Choosing An Online Psychiatrist – click here.

 

 

 

Top 10 Most Common Thoughts of Those with PTSD.

 

One of the worst things about post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can be that we feel completely alone and cut off from the rest of society. We can feel that nobody else could possibly comprehend the intensity of our suffering. This is certainly what I felt when my depression and anxiety were at their worst – indeed, I felt like this for several years as all therapeutic interventions in the first few years of my condition failed.

When we are at our lowest, it can be helpful to remember that others are suffering as much as we are. In the case of PTSD, research has shown that sufferers tend to have the same kind of thoughts – I list the top ten below:

– I can’t trust people anymore

– Other people want to harm me and the world is a dangerous and  threatening place

– I am utterly helpless

– The reason I can’t cope is that I’m weak

– Something terrible is just about to happen

– I am completely unable to cope and this will never change

– It’s my fault that the trauma happened, I should have done something which would have prevented it

– From now on I can’t make a single mistake, if I do, it will be extremely dangerous to me

– I can never rely on anyone to protect me

– I will never recover from feeling this way

It should be noted that these thoughts could be operating beneath the level of conscious awareness – therapy can help expose these underlying core beliefs and help the individual to replace them with more positive ones; cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is often very effective in this regard. However, some people are uncertain whether or not to seek such therapy (many are available in addition to CBT). As a general guide, it is probably best to seek professional help if you are suffering from symptoms such as those described below:

One of the main questions to ask is:

– Are my symptoms interfering with my social, occupational or academic functioning?

If this is the case, it is definitely advisable to seek expert advice on what kind of therapy may ameliorate your symptoms. Even just talking to someone about the traumatic experience/s can be of value. Specific symptoms that can be addressed through various types of therapy include :

– poor sleep/insomnia

– the development of a harmful dependence on alcohol and/or drugs

– intrusive and distressing nightmares, memories or flashbacks

– constantly feeling agitated and irritable

– difficulty responding on an emotional level  to family/partner

Professional support is particularly advisable for those who are socially isolated and/or have nobody else to talk to about their traumatic experiences.

I hope you have found this post helpful.

Best Wishes, David Hosier BSc Hons; MSc; PGDE(FAHE).

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