Category Archives: Articles

Intellectualization as a Defense Mechanism Following Childhood Trauma

 

Intellectualisation is a psychological defense mechanism which serves as an escape route from interacting on an emotional level with others, and the outside world in general, into the refuge of ‘the life of the mind’. People who employ this

Childhood Trauma Leading to Development of Negative Schema

What Are Schema?

The term ‘schema‘ refers to the fundamental beliefs and feelings we have about ourselves, others, and the world in general – together with how these interact. They are very deep rooted and enduring.

We develop

Neuroplasticity : 3 Ways Brain Can Physically Recover From Trauma

 

Above: video summary of this article (Neuroplasticity : 3 Ways The Brain Can Physically Recover From Trauma).

 

THE BRAIN AND NEUROPLASTICITY :

I have previously written articles on how early life trauma can adversely affect the physical development

Always ‘Zoning Out’? : Dissociative Disorder Explained.

Zone Out A Lot?

Those of us who experienced significant childhood trauma are at a far higher risk of developing the psychiatric condition known as DISSOCIATIVE DISORDER in adulthood than are the rest of the population.

Unfortunately, however, it often

Stressful Experiences Linked to Childhood Obesity

We are frequently reminded by the media that, in the western world, obesity in children has increased at an alarming rate since around the 1970s; worse, this rate of increase is expected to keep on growing for the foreseeable future.

The Brain, Neuroscience and Meditation

THE PHYSICAL BRAIN :

The brain – the most complex entity in the known universe – controls our thoughts, moods, behaviour and memories. It is clearly a physical entity, but neuroscientists are still a long way from being able to

Emotional Torture? When Parents Put Kids in a Psychological Double-Bind.

I first came across the phrase ‘double-bind’ at university whilst studying for my first degree in psychology; it struck a chord immediately.

In its most simple terms, the child who is placed in a psychological double-bind, by parent/s or carers,