How Hypnosis Changes The Brain

childhood_trauma_hypnosis

We have seen from many of the articles that I have previously published on this site that significant childhood trauma can actually physically damage the developing human brain; in particular, it can adversely affect the development of a brain area called the amygdala, which is involved in emotional processing.

However, we have also seen that, because it is now known the brain can change itself in positive ways when we are adults (due to a property of the brain known as neuroplasticity), this damage can be reversed.

The use of mindfulness meditation has been shown in research to help the brain recovery from the physical damage done to it in childhood, and, now, recent research has shown hypnosis, too, can change the way in which the brain works and in a manner that can be detected through the use of brain scans / brain imaging.

 

HOW HYPNOSIS CHANGES THE BRAIN:

Kosslyn, a researcher from Harvard University, USA, carried out an experiment on colour perception which involved eight participants.

Each participant was shown brightly coloured rectangles and, under hypnosis, instructed to imagine the colour ‘draining’ from them. This resulted in brain activity that caused them to pereive the brightly coloured blocks as gray.

Color changes hypnosis

The reverse was also true; when instructed, under hypnosis, to ‘see’ gray blocks as brightly colored, they did indeed, due to the change in brain activity caused by hypnosis, perceive the (in reality, gray) blocks as colored.

(For those who are interested, the brain activity of the participants was measured by employing the use of PET [positron emission tomography] scans.

It is also highly important to note that when the participants were asked to perceive these color changes taking place but were NOT under hypnosis, the same changes in brain activity and color perception did NOT occur: this demonstrates that hypnosis used in the experiment was having a very real, measurable and observable (via brain scanning) effect.

This effect is thought to work, Kosslyn explains, because under hypnosis the brain’s right hemisphere, which deals with, amongst other imagination and expectations, is ACTIVATED (whereas the left hemisphere of the brain, dominant when the individual is not under hypnosis, operates more according to logic).

Kosslyn suggests that it might very well be the ability of hypnosis to activate the right hemisphere of the brain that also lies behind the success that hypnotherapy can have when it is used to treat problems such as insomnia, anxiety, pain management and other difficulties in which a person’s psychology plays a pivotal role.

 

David Hosier BSc Hons; MSc; PGDE(FAHE).

 

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